GERMAN PHONE NUMBERS YOU SHOULD KNOW IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

German emergency numbers

One of the most important things to know for any country you visit or move to is how to say “Can I use your restrooms?” in the native language – closely followed by emergency phone numbers.

So, without further ado: here’s a list of the most important German phone numbers you should know. Learn them by heart, put them in your phone, download and print the list on the bottom and stick it to your fridge.

Nevertheless, avoid having to use these numbers in the first place. One way is to stay safe around yellowjackets, which can be a problem in Germany. Click here to find out how.

PHONE NUMBERS YOU SHOULD KNOW BY HEART

These are the most important numbers you need to know when living in Germany. Memorize them and teach them to your kids.

I’ve heard people say that the operators may not speak English, so please be aware of that. Look up some useful words and phrases beforehand and memorize those too.

You may not be able to think straight in an emergency, so it’s a good idea to practice these calls in German beforehand.

Continue reading to find out about Germany’s emergency phone numbers.

Police: 110

Use this number for emergencies, if you feel threatened or if you’re in danger.

Fire department/paramedics: 112

Call in case of fires, accidents, and life-threatening medical emergencies like heart attack, stroke, choking, anaphylaxis, severe burns, asthma attacks, etc.

Standby doctors: 116117

This is for urgent, but not life-threatening health issues – so, whenever you’d go see a doctor, but they’re closed, like late at night or on the weekends.

Poison center: Click here for the list

There’s one in most major cities. Call them if someone has ingested or come in touch with a (potentially) toxic substance.

German emergency numbers

PHONE NUMBERS YOU SHOULD SAVE IN YOUR PHONE

You don’t need to know the following numbers by heart, but it’s helpful to have them on your phone, just in case you need them.

Emergency pharmacy: 22833

Call this number when you need a pharmacy but they’re closed.

Crisis line (Samaritans): 116123

This number is for suicide prevention, addiction, loneliness, relationship problems, bullying, etc.

Women’s helpline: 08000116016

Geared towards women affected by abuse.

Child and youth helpline: 116111

This number is for children and teenagers who are facing problems, abuse, bullying, etc.

BONUS NUMBER THAT WON’T HURT TO KNOW

Heimwegtelefon: 03012074182 (Sun-Thur: 8pm-12am, Fri and Sat: 8pm-3am)

This helpline is for anyone worried about walking home alone. You can tell them your exact location and they will stay on the phone with you until you’re home. That way someone will know where you are and if anything happens, they will alert the police.

The idea is for you to look more confident by having a fun conversation and thus give off less of a victim vibe, while also feeling safe knowing that someone is there with you.

I am not sure whether they offer their services in English but it’s worth a try. Check out their website to learn more.

WHAT IF THERE IS NO CELL SERVICE?

All across Europe, even without reception, you should still be able to call 112. If it doesn’t work, walk a few meters and try again.

Note: this only goes for 112 – not 110.

Stay safe!

German emergency numbers

DISCLAIMER

The information in this article is provided for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for advice provided by a doctor or other qualified health care professional. Always consult with a doctor or other health care professional for medical advice or information about diagnosis and treatment.

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